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 Latest News 28 September 2009

Notice of Meeting

AGENDA for AGM of the

AUSTRALIAN VETERANS TABLE TENNIS ASSOCIATION

Interim Committee comprising Ken Cole, Martin Solomons, Prisca Rosario, Clive Sim and Case de Bondt.

Date: Thursday evening, 22 October 2009

Place: Hurstville Stadium, Time 9.00pm

Chairman pro tempore, Ken Cole

1.    Confirm Minutes Inaugural Meeting October 2008 in Perth.

       Copy on Website.

 2.    Receive Interim Committee’s Report

       a   Draft Constitution (copy on www.ausvet.wordpress.com)

       b   Contact with Table Tennis Australia

       c    Bank Account (present signatories Martin Solomons, Case de Bondt)      

       d   Transactions during the year

       e    Setting up of own Website

 3.    Elect Officers and State Representatives of the Committee

       a   Chairman,     Ken Cole is nominated

       b   Vice Chairman

       c    Secretary/Public Officer, at present Case de Bondt

       d   Treasurer

       e    State representatives to represent all States and Territories

 4.    Next year’s Australian Open Veterans Championships

       a   Under the auspices of AusVet Inc. away from MSAC

       b   Status quo and stage at MSAC

 5.     General Business   (levies, setting of registration fees etc.)   

 A most sincere welcome to all veteran table tennis players within Australia and those friends overseas who also have an interest in table tennis for veteran players in our organised categories from O/40s to O/80s. Although veteran’s table tennis within Australia began at State levels in the 1960s our fledgling Association was not decided until our inaugural meeting at the 25th National Veteran’s Championships in Perth, Western Australia, in October 2008 (Minutes of said meeting now posted under Archives).

Through the past three decades, veteran’s table tennis has grown from a very small minority to now boast the largest annual tournament held nationally.  The annual national championships now attracts more than 300 entrants from all States and a few other nations vying for honours in seven age categories for both genders in the friendly spirit of camaraderie which has been established since 1984 (to be featured in a series of articles in the Historical Section).

During that extended passing of time many veteran players had expressed the view that we now warrant our very own autonomous organisation that functions independently though in harmonious co-operation with Table Tennis Australia.

Please feel free to scan our communications medium and be welcome to express opinion on any matters posted regularly in our website.

Sincerely, from the (temporary) Site Editor,

Case de Bondt   caseybul1@bigpond.com

caseybul@bigpond.com  &  caseybul@hotmail.co.nz 

NOTE : additional e-mail addresses

Peter De Low kindly sent us the photograph of his mother in action. He said it was his favourite photograph of his mother playing our game.

We look upon Dorothy as representing the very image of what our sport is all about, when we enter the latter part of our lives.

We also acknowledge the photographer, Anna Pha for taking this wonderful action shot of Doris De Low which you can view below.

Only a few weeks ago I noticed an article espousing moderate physical activity to be very helpful to preserve the brain’s ability to memorise and think as we age.  This article was written by the U.S Alzheimer’s Association and their Californian researchers said that cognitive decline was much faster in those who were sedentary.

It was shown that sedentary elders who began exercising experienced improvement in cognitive function.  “Research continues to show us that there are lifestyle decisions we can all make to keep our brains healthier, and that also may lower our risk of memory decline as we age,” according to William Thies, chief medical and scientific officer at the Alzheimer’s Association.

The following article (by Case de Bondt) was published in Nets & Vets, the Victorian veterans  monthly newsletter.

 

       

 

  

 

 

 

 

 

At 81 years of age she won the Veteran World Table Tennis Championships in Dublin, Ireland for those over 80 years of age. Few players of any sport become a World Champion in their eighties!

In 2008, nearing 98 years of age, she travelled all the way to Rio de Janeiro in South America to compete in her 10th consecutive bi-annual World Veteran’s Championships, representing Australia.

She was the recipient of the Bronze medal in the Rio championships. This ensued in her setting a unique World Record in the Guinness Book of Records of being the oldest competitor in world table tennis.The World Championships in which Dorothy has represented Australia were held in 1990 Baltimore; 1992 Dublin; 1994 Melbourne;

1996 Lillehammer; 1998 Manchester, 2000 Vancouver; 2002 Lucerne;

2004 Yokohama; 2006 Bremen and 2008 Rio de Janeiro.

She is a globe trotter of the first order who also competes in the Australian and New Zealand Veterans National Championships.

The Lord willing, Dot De Low hopes to compete in the next World Veteran’s Championships in Hohot, Mongolia in 2010, the year she turns one hundred!

Presently, at 98 years of age, she is still very active in community work and is interested in everything that goes on. She keeps house and garden by herself and lives in her home alone.

Dorothy is still licensed to drive her car and is so independent that she refuses home help of any sort and does not avail herself of meals-on-wheels. Her only son Peter now takes time off to take her shopping, but hopes his mother will consider accepting some home help to assist him in this.

 

Not being satisfied with just playing table tennis and assisting with coaching and exhibition play over the past 40 years, Dorothy was the oldest volunteer to help out at the 2000 Sydney Olympics and Paralympics.

To quote her son, Mr Peter De Low:

 

 “Mother is currently working as a volunteer for the Pensioners and Superannuants visiting ‘old people’ in nursing homes.”

 

   “In earlier times she worked on Meals on Wheels and was always driving around picking up elderly people and taking them to concerts.”   “She became a Justice of the Peace in the mid-1950’s and continued 

in this capacity until a review of the system in NSW eliminated ‘life

tenure’ in the late 1990’s.”

    “She was the oldest volunteer at the 2000 Olympic Games and also

the 2000 Paralympics Games.”

    “The Olympic Volunteers parade in which Dorothy marched was held

on her 90th birthday.”

   “My sister Joan died of breast cancer in 1983. This affected my mother 

greatly as you would expect. She visits (drives herself) to her ashes site

 every fortnight with fresh flowers – a round trip of over 60 kilometres.

Consequently, Dorothy has been keen to raise funds for

cancer research and has donated $200 per year to this cause since

1983.”

    “When she came from England for the World Veterans the BBC wanted to

interview her and she negotiated a 100 pound fee in the form of a

cheque for the NSW Cancer Council.”

As the Australian community becomes progressively older and many folk

retire much earlier, Dorothy De Low’s example to all retirees in our country,

indeed the whole world, is pertinent and timely. The joy this lady exudes to

everyone and the happiness she receives from being so active and

involved is a reminder to all that retirement can mean a whole new

existence, indeed a whole new healthy, happy life.

Imagine how many citizens would be so much more independent, healthy

and contented by avoiding premature hospitalisation and becoming early

inhabitants of aged institutions, when emulating Dorothy. Imagine the

enormous savings this would bring to the community at large and to

Australia as a whole, if we all were to be inspired by her example.

The joy that Dot De Low exhibits, wherever she travels, the joy that comes

from giving rather than receiving, is no more evident than when she is

feted and lauded by the media in every country she competes in, be it

television or printed press. No veteran table tennis player has received as

much world-wide adoration and publicity as Dorothy has.

Her sense of humour is second to none and can readily be seen reading

the many anecdotes concerning and attributed to her. She even had an

Ode written and sung about her by Gordon Lee during the presentation

ceremony at the 2008 Australian Veterans Championships in Perth, WA

(see elsewhere on this site, which can be downloaded and listened to)

We commend Dorothy De Low as an outstanding example of what can be

achieved by senior citizens with a positive approach to the latter stages of

their lives.

 

  

  

 

 

 

  

 

 

 

  

 

 

Newsletter No 64

June 2009

Doris De Low

Doris De Low

NETS & VETS

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  

 

 

 

With her recent acknowledgement in the Guinness Book of Records as the most elderly competition player in World table tennis Ms Dorothy De Low is  a unique individual. Complimentary to exemplary sporting achievements that have extended almost to her 100th year Ms De Low should be upheld as an iconic example to Australia’s senior citizens.

Ms De Low was born as Dorthy Mary Trigg on 5th October 1910 in Wembley, England. Two years later she arrived as an infant in Australia with her mother, three brothers and two sisters and her mother’s sister. Her father came some months earlier to arrange accommodation etc.

 

 

Some 55 years later Dorothy took up the sport of table tennis “to keep physically fit and mentally agile”. During the intervening 44 years she found that engaging in this fastest of all ball games helped her to this purpose. She experienced that the fast hand-eye coordination within a relatively small area keeps one mentally alert and in fine fettle. The activity lends itself well to most people of all ages, both young and old.

Losing her husband, Albert and her only daughter, Joan within the short time span of 18 months, in the mid-1980s, Dot De Low threw herself into what she saw as the therapeutic pastime of Veterans’ Table Tennis.

 

 This culminated in this feisty lady becoming a World Champion in her chosen sport a few years later. She is a prime example for all senior people to emulate.

 

  

 

 

 

  

 

 

 

With her recent acknowledgement in the Guinness Book of Records as the most elderly competition player in World table tennis Ms Dorothy De Low is a unique individual. Complimentary to exemplary sporting achievements that have extended almost to her 100th year Ms De Low should be upheld as an iconic example to Australia’s senior citizens.

 

 

  

T

 

  

  

 

  

TESTIMONIAL FOR DOT DE LOW

  

Ms De Low was born as Dorothy Mary Trigg on 5th October 1910 in Wembley, England. Two years later she arrived as an infant in Australia with her mother, three brothers and two sisters and her mother’s sister. Her father came some months earlier to arrange accommodation etc.

Some 55 years later Dorothy took up the sport of table tennis “to keep physically fit and mentally agile”. During the intervening 44 years she found that engaging in this fastest of all ball games helped her to this purpose. She experienced that the fast hand-eye coordination within a relatively small area keeps one mentally alert and in fine fettle. The activity lends itself well to most people of all ages, both young and old.

Losing her husband, Albert and her only daughter, Joan within the short time span of 18 months, in the mid-1980s, Dot De Low threw herself into what she saw as the therapeutic pastime of Veterans’ Table Tennis.

This culminated in this feisty lady becoming a World Champion in her chosen sport a few years later. She is a prime example for all senior people to emulate.

 

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
 

 

 

 

 

 

 
 

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